in

Andy Murray posts emotional selfie with mother Judy

Sir Andy Murray today revealed he had shared a ‘big cuddle’ with his mother after emotionally announcing that he is planning to retire after Wimbledon.

The former world number one tennis star has battled to recover from a chronic hip condition for more than 18 months, undergoing surgery in Melbourne a year ago.

But he was forced to admit in a tearful press conference earlier today that he was still struggling and next week’s Australian Open could be his final tournament.

Andy Murray, 31, posted a picture of him smiling with mother Judy, 59, on Instagram today

Andy Murray, 31, posted a picture of him smiling with mother Judy, 59, on Instagram today

After an outpouring of support from sports fans, Sir Andy posted a picture of him smiling with mother Judy, 59, who has been the driving force behind his career.

The 31-year-old double Olympic champion from Dunblane wrote on Instagram: ‘Best way to feel better after a tough day is a big cuddle from your mum.

The 31-year-old double Olympic champion from Dunblane posted on Instagram today

The 31-year-old double Olympic champion from Dunblane posted on Instagram today

‘Genuinely been very touched by all of the messages and support from everybody today…

‘It means a lot and has made me feel much more positive than when I woke this morning. Thank you so much.’

Sir Andy was on the verge of breaking down as he entered the press room earlier today and, asked how his hip was feeling, only managed to say ‘not great’.

He was then overcome by his emotions and had to leave the room, before returning after several minutes to deliver his devastating news.

The Scot broke down in tears during his press conference as he announced his decision to end his career at Wimbledon

Andy Murray, Britain's greatest ever tennis player, is set to retire this year after failing to overcome a longstanding hip injury 

The Scot broke down in tears during his press conference today as he announced his decision to end his career at Wimbledon, ahead of the 2019 Australian Open at Melbourne Park

The former world number one has been struggling with his injury for more than 18 months

The former world number one has been struggling with his injury for more than 18 months

Sir Andy said: ‘Obviously I’ve been struggling for a long time. I’ve been in a lot of pain for about 20 months now.

Dunblane locals send best wishes to famous son Sir Andy Murray

Residents of Dunblane have hailed the tennis career of the town’s most famous son, and wished him a bright future when he lays down his racket.

The Scottish town near Stirling where Sir Andy Murray grew up has become synonymous with the tennis star.

Tennis balls laid out at Dunblane Tennis Club in Andy Murray's home town today

Tennis balls laid out at Dunblane Tennis Club in Andy Murray’s home town today

A golden post box stands in the High Street in recognition of his Olympic win in 2012, and the court at the local sports club is rarely without young Wimbledon hopefuls hitting some balls, inspired by the 2013 champion.

Local resident Bill Drummond, 71, said of Sir Andy’s decision to retire this year: ‘I think it’s the right thing to do – he’s a young man, he’s got the rest of his life ahead of him.

‘If he doesn’t take care, it will affect him. I just wish him well. He’s done so well to get to where he has. It’s good to think of the good he’s done, and the future he’s got ahead of him.

‘He can look back on his past feeling he’s achieved so much, and got so much to look forward to.

‘He’s been great for Dunblane. Dunblane was remembered for all the wrong reasons – we used to go on holiday and we’d try and avoid saying where we were from. But latterly it was hailed as Andy Murray territory, so it’s been amazing for the town.

A golden post box stands in the High Street in recognition of his Olympic win in 2012 

A golden post box stands in the High Street in recognition of his Olympic win in 2012 

‘He’s done great for Dunblane, for Scotland and tennis. We’ve always watched tennis, but for him to be part of it, it meant so much more.

‘Good luck to him. It’s sad news but he needs to do it. I’m actually kind of relieved to be honest, because you could see he was not quite right.’

Fellow resident George Majury said: ‘He’ll end up losing to players that are so far below him in the rankings, and maybe detract from what he’s achieved.’

Asked what Sir Andy has done for Dunblane, the 71-year-old added: ‘He has put us in the world news for all the right reasons.’

‘I’ve pretty much done everything that I could to try and get my hip feeling better and it hasn’t helped loads. I’m in a better place than I was six months ago but still in a lot of pain. It’s been tough.’

Sir Andy will contest his first-round match against Spain’s Roberto Bautista Agut on Monday but that may prove to be the final match of his illustrious career.

The 31-year-old said: ‘I’m going to play. I can still play to a level. Not a level that I’m happy playing at. But it’s not just that. 

‘The pain is too much really and I don’t want to continue playing that way.

‘During my training block (in Miami last month) I spoke to my team and told them I can’t keep doing this. 

‘I needed to have an end point because I was sort of playing with no idea when the pain was going to stop.

‘I said to my team, look I think I can get through this until Wimbledon. That’s where I’d like to stop playing. But I’m also not certain I’m able to do that.’

After another pause while Sir Andy sat with his head on the desk, he was asked whether this might be his last tournament.

‘Yes I think there’s a chance of that for sure because I’m not sure I’m able to play through the pain for another four or five months,’ he said.

‘I have an option to have another operation, which is a little bit more severe than what I’ve had before in having my hip resurfaced, which will allow me to have a better quality of life and be out of pain.

‘That’s something I’m seriously considering right now. Some athletes have had that and gone back to competing but there’s obviously no guarantees with that and the reason for having an operation like that is not to return to professional sport, it’s just for a better quality of life.’

The hip problem first emerged after his French Open semi-final loss to Stan Wawrinka in June 2017, although Sir Andy revealed as he limped through Wimbledon that he had been managing a condition for a number of years.

He did not play again for nearly 12 months but had been relentlessly positive about his progress despite all evidence to the contrary. It was clear, though, as he started this season that something had changed.

Despite spending four months focusing on reconditioning ahead of 2019 in an effort to start the year healthy, his movement was still restricted in a loss to Daniil Medvedev in Brisbane and then even more so in a dispiriting practice match against Novak Djokovic in Melbourne on Thursday.

After that he headed off to see John O’Donnell, the surgeon who performed the operation last year.

‘I have a severely damaged right hip,’ said Sir Andy. ‘Having the operation last year was to give it the best possible chance of being better. 

‘I have been playing with hip pain for a number of years, it wasn’t as if it just started at the French Open after my match against Stan. 

Timeline of Sir Andy Murray’s injury woes 

June 9, 2017 – Murray puts shaky form going into the French Open behind him to reach the semi-finals before losing to Swiss ace Stan Wawrinka but begins to feel the flare-up of a long-standing hip issue that had previously been under control

June 27, 2017 – Murray does not mention his hip problem after losing his first match at Queen’s to Jordan Thompson but is forced to publicly acknowledge it when he pulls out of a scheduled exhibition match at the Hurlingham Club, a move cited as precautionary

July 2, 2017 – After pulling out of a second Hurlingham match, Murray calms fears he may be forced to miss Wimbledon by confirming on the eve of the tournament that he will play

July 12, 2017 – Walking with a noticeable limp, Murray battles his way into the quarter-finals but his title defence ends with a five-set loss to Sam Querrey. Afterwards, Murray insists he does not expect to be away from the tour for too long

August 26, 2017 – After pulling out of two Masters events and losing his world No 1 ranking to Rafael Nadal, Murray travels to New York intending to return at the US Open. But two days before the tournament he announces at a press conference that he is pulling out, saying his hip is too sore to give him a chance of winning the tournament

September 6, 2017 – Murray heads home for further consultations with a number of hip specialists then announces he is likely to miss the rest of the year but is hoping to avoid surgery

January 2, 2018 – Murray schedules the Brisbane International for his second attempt at a comeback only to pull out on the eve of his first match. In a heartfelt post on Instagram accompanied by a childhood photo, Murray says: ‘I choose this pic as the little kid inside me just wants to play tennis and compete. I genuinely miss it so much and I would give anything to be back out there.’

January 8, 2018 – Murray announces he has undergone hip surgery in Melbourne. In an upbeat assessment, he says surgeon John O’Donnell is very happy and that he is targeting a return for the grass-court season

March 28, 2018 – Murray posts his first picture on social media after returning to on-court training at Patrick Mouratoglou’s academy in Nice

May 8, 2018 – After Murray does not enter a Challenger tournament in Glasgow that had been earmarked for his return, it emerges he has suffered a setback in his recovery and has been forced to take more time away from the court

June 5, 2018 – Murray says he is ‘getting closer’ to a return but pulls out of his scheduled first grass event of the season at the Libema Open in Holland

June 16, 2018 – After two weeks back on court, Murray announces just before the draw that he will make his comeback at the Fever-Tree Championships at Queen’s Club

June 19, 2018 – A lengthy 342 days since his last competitive outing, Murray finally makes it back on court in the Fever-Tree Championships against Nick Kyrgios. He puts up a good fight but eventually loses his first-round match 2-6, 7-6 (7/4) 7-5.

June 25, 2018 – Murray beats Wawrinka at Eastbourne but is then comfortably dispatched in the round of 16 by British No 1 Kyle Edmund as he continues to feel his way back into games

July 30, 2018 – Murray fans grow in confidence at the Scot’s increased participation and a run to the quarter-finals – where he is beaten due to a walkover for Alex de Minaur – suggests he is slowly on the rise again

August 13, 2018 – A first round exit to Lucas Pouille shows that Murray is struggling to recapture the form that saw him go on to win Wimbledon twice as his hip issues see him hold back in three-set match

August 30, 2018 – In only his fifth tournament back since returning from hip surgery, Murray falters in four sets against Fernando Verdasco 7-5, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 in the US Open second round as the sweltering conditions did little to help his cause. His noticeable limp between points became more and more obvious as the points rolled on 

September 28, 2018 – A quarter-final defeat in Shenzen to Verdasco sees Murray call time on the 2018 season as he takes time away to get himself in the best possible condition for the 2019 Australian Open

December 27, 2018 – Despite some time away since losing to Verdasco in Asia, Murray admits the pain is still prominent as he prepares to play in the Brisbane International, a warm-up tournament for the Australian Open. In his last-16 tie against Russian star Daniil Medvedev, Murray is comfortably beaten 7-5, 6-2 as fears grow over the condition of his hip 

January 10, 2019 – Leaves Australian Open press conference in tears and suggests his time in Melbourne could be his last Grand Slam tournament due to the pain being too much to continue playing through

‘It got to a level where I didn’t recover from that match, pushed it over the edge.

‘Having the operation would hopefully make it as good as possible. It didn’t help with the pain at all. 

‘There are certain things on the court I cannot really do properly now, but the pain is the driving factor.

‘I can play with limitations, that’s not an issue, it’s having the limitations and also the pain is not allowing me to enjoy competing, training or any of the stuff I love about tennis.

‘I have tried to deal with it, talked about it, but none of that makes my hip feel better, unfortunately. I wish it did, because if it did, it would be feeling brilliant right now.’

It is especially cruel that the problem emerged only a few months after Sir Andy ascended to the top of the world rankings, cutting short a career that looked like it had a lot more to give.

But, even if he does not win another match, he will go down in history as Britain’s finest tennis player and one of the country’s greatest ever sports stars.

Sir Andy’s former tennis coach, Brian Melville, 68, paid tribute to the sportsman’s efforts to get youngsters onto the courts at the Dunblane Sports Club near Stirling.

Mr Melville, who is now retired, said: ‘It was no surprise because he’s been struggling for the past couple of years. He has to think about his health. 

‘He’s achieved everything in tennis. I know he would like to do it again but it’s not possible. He’s got more people playing the game here, and I hope, on other courts as well. 

‘There’s been an increase in membership here. There’s lots of kids playing and hopefully a winner will come through.’

The appreciative British public were quick to praise Sir Andy on Twitter today, sparking the hashtag #ThankYouAndy and lauding him for not only his sporting accomplishments but also his work as a role model.

But not everyone was so touched by his speech, with TalkSport presenter Alan Brazil causing a storm online after mocking the tennis star for ‘blubbing’.

Many congratulated him on his successful career, in which he won three Grand Slam titles, two Olympic Gold Medals and the Davis Cup with Great Britain in 2015.

Others mocked up memes and pictures to celebrate his accomplishments, even superimposing his face on Mel Gibson from Braveheart.

Writing on Twitter, Gus Duran said: ‘I will never forget @andy_murray first Wimbledon win.

‘The perseverance of that day and throughout your career is how I’ll remember you. #ThankYouAndy for being an inspiration both inside and outside the court. But most importantly, for being someone I can look up to.’

Stefan Gamlich added: ‘Cheers @andy_murray, You made history! The game will not be the same without You… #AndyMurray #AUSOpen #ThankyouAndyMurray #ThankYouAndy’.

Danny Jamieson tweeted: ‘It’s caused heated debate in our office today, but I can’t think of anyone who tops Andy Murray as Britain’s greatest sportsman.’ 

And another Twitter user wrote: ‘Thank you Sir Andy. One of the greatest sportsman Scotland has ever produced.

‘You’re a legend and an inspiration to so many young people across Britain. Hold your head high Sir.’

But others highlighted his efforts to stand up for gender equality, calling for more women to get top jobs in sport and regularly calling out journalists for overlooking female players.

Sir Andy, who has two young daughters with wife Kim, has also spoken of wanting them to have the same opportunities as men in their careers and lives.

Dan Chisholm wrote on Twitter: ‘I don’t imagine Andy Murray will see this among thousands of messages but while this is such a tough decision, nothing can take away his place in history.

‘Plus, a rare male voice who has stood up for equality. Well done Sir Andy, #champion in so many ways.’

Johanna Donovan added: ‘@andy_murray is a total legend, not only in the amazing individual achievements, but in the #DavisCup team and standing up for gender equality and women in tennis – all with an charming self deprecating humour.’

Sir Andy is also well known for being a passionate Scot – and was criticised early on in his career for saying he would want ‘anyone but England’ to win the 2006 World Cup.

He quickly won back fans south of the border with his efforts on the court, but continues to be an icon in his home country.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon led local praise after watching his announcement in an emotional press conference.

She tweeted: ‘Andy Murray is a legend – without doubt one of Scotland’s greatest ever sportsmen, as well as an outstanding role model and inspiration for young people everywhere. 

He lifted the Wimbledon trophy for a second time in 2016, after beating Canadian Milos Raonic on Centre court at SW19

Andy with his wife Kim

Sir Andy is a double-Wimbledon champion, having last lifted the trophy in 2016 (shown left). He is pictured alongside his wife Kim at the Wimbledon Winners’ Ball that year (right)

Sir Andy was beaten in a practice match by Novak Djokovic yesterday before the competition

Sir Andy was beaten in a practice match by Novak Djokovic yesterday before the competition

 Murray is a two-time Wimbledon winner (pictured after his victory in 2016), a US Open winner, a double Olympic gold medallist  and a former World No 1

 Murray is a two-time Wimbledon winner (pictured after his victory in 2016), a US Open winner, a double Olympic gold medallist  and a former World No 1

Murray poses with the Wimbledon trophy, and his wife Kim, after his first victory in 2013, where he beat Novak Djokovic

Murray poses with the Wimbledon trophy, and his wife Kim, after his first victory in 2013, where he beat Novak Djokovic

‘A credit to sport and to the country. Sending him very best wishes.’

What could Sir Andy do when he retires? 

After dedicating his life to his on-court pursuit, Sir Andy will now begin a new chapter as he looks to his future. So what might the 31-year-old do next?

Management

Although he would not have expected it to come so soon, Murray has been planning for life off the court for some time. He set up his sports management agency, 77, with business advisers Matt Gentry and Gawain Davies in 2013 and has signed up a number of young athletes, among them tennis players Aidan McHugh and Katie Swan. Murray is unlikely to become a travelling coach, at least in the short term, but mentoring young professionals and helping them avoid some of the pitfalls he suffered is something that motivates him.

Investment

Murray has an interest in business and technology and partnered with equity crowdfunding platform Seedrs in 2015. The Scot focuses on investing in start-ups and told Forbes last summer that he has stakes in more than 30 ventures. Property is another interest. Murray bought Cromlix House hotel near his home town of Dunblane in 2013, turning it into a luxury venue.

Media

Murray tried his hand at punditry as he sat out last year’s Wimbledon and, unsurprisingly, proved a natural. Often depicted as dour and boring, the Scot in fact has a dry wit and easy manner, and his encyclopaedic knowledge of tennis and intelligent analysis would make him a very welcome addition to the world of broadcasting. He has no huge desire to be in front of a camera, and the length of the match he commentated on between Rafael Nadal and Juan Martin del Potro was an eye-opener, but he may dip in and out like Tim Henman.

Davis Cup

When Leon Smith decides to relinquish the reins as Great Britain captain, who better to step into his shoes than the man who carried his country to the 2015 title virtually single-handed? Murray has always loved the team environment and would surely prove an inspirational figure. With the restructuring of the competition meaning fewer ties, it would be a manageable commitment.

Scottish Labour leader Richard Leonard also called Sir Andy ‘one of our country’s greatest ever sportsmen’.

He added: ‘I’ll be cheering him on in the Australian Open and hopefully Wimbledon too.’

Tracey Crouch, the UK sports minister when Sir Andy claimed his second Wimbledon title in 2016, said she was ‘sorry’ to hear of his retirement.

She added: ‘He’s such a phenomenal competitor in an era of other great players, a champion for equality in sport and a genuinely nice guy.

‘I think his legacy of inspiring the next generation will live long.’

As well as his glittering tennis career, he was also hailed by Labour MP Jess Phillips for being a ‘normal bloke, and best of all casual feminist’.

His decision to appoint Amelie Mauresmo as his coach in 2014 was considered a groundbreaking moment in the sport.

Questions have been raised over what will come next for Sir Andy, who already acts as an official mentor for young sports men and women through his management company.

Rising tennis star Katie Swan tweeted: ‘You were my biggest idol growing up and now I’m lucky enough to call you my mentor @andy-murray thank you for showing me what it means to never give up.’

The programme even reaches his beloved Hibernian Football Club, where two players are under the Grand Slam winner’s stewardship.

In a tweet from Hibs’ official account, head coach Neil Lennon said: ‘Andy Murray is an inspiration and a role model. He’s been the ideal mentor to Fraser Murray and Ryan Porteous.

‘I hope he’s able to finish an incredible career on his terms. Everyone at Hibernian Football Club is rooting for him.’

Meanwhile Scottish drinks company Irn Bru tweeted its own tribute with an old picture of Sir Andy sipping from a bottle with the simple caption: ‘Here’s to you, @Andy-Murray’.

And the official Wimbledon Twitter account tweeted an image of two-time winner Sir Andy celebrating victory on Centre Court.

It added: ‘To Andy, Whatever happens next, you’ve done more than you know.’

 

Could he return to his former school as a PE teacher? Pupil has a novel idea for Sir Andy Murray’s retirement

A budding tennis star at Sir Andy Murray’s former school hopes the Wimbledon champion will return as a PE teacher after he retires.

Dunblane Primary School pupil Gregor Wood said he was shocked to hear of Sir Andy’s plans to leave the game this year due to ongoing injury, but the youngster already has high hopes for what the tennis ace might do next.

‘He should be a PE teacher here,’ primary seven pupil Gregor said. ‘I think he would be quite a good one.’

Primary three pupils Holly Anderson (centre right) with Zoe Rae holding a photo of Sir Andy Murray today alongside classmates at Dunblane Primary School in the tennis star's hometown

Primary three pupils Holly Anderson (centre right) with Zoe Rae holding a photo of Sir Andy Murray today alongside classmates at Dunblane Primary School in the tennis star’s hometown

‘I was shocked that he was retiring because he’s just played so well and I kind of wanted him to keep going, but because of his hip I guess it’s probably time for him to stop.’

The youngster met Sir Andy when he returned to his old school for a visit, and he said the Wimbledon champion was ‘quite laid back’ and told the pupils he hoped some of them would follow in his footsteps.

Gregor hopes to be able to do so as his tennis is ‘quite good’, and he credited Sir Andy’s determination as one of his most inspirational qualities.

He said: ‘He’s not given up because of his hip and he’s had that pain for about a year now. He’s not given up and he’s kept on playing.’

Fellow P7 pupil Katie Cullen also met the tennis star when he returned to the school, and she said he was ‘funny’ and ‘very inspirational’.

Holly (left) and Emily Sorbie take part in Dunblane Primary School's Miss-hits Tennis club today

Holly (left) and Emily Sorbie take part in Dunblane Primary School’s Miss-hits Tennis club today

She added: ‘I was quite sad and shocked that he was retiring but still happy that he’s going to be able to rest his hip and not have to worry about competitions.

‘He’s an inspiration, he always inspires us to do sport and to be the best you can be.’

Headteacher Lorraine Slabbert said she is ‘hugely sad’ Sir Andy plans to retire this year as he has been a ‘huge inspiration’.

She added: ‘However with everything we do in Dunblane we talk about a positive spin on that, and actually my thought immediately was ‘what’s next for him and what more impact can he have’?

‘He’s already had a huge impact in the school but actually he’s got a job to do next, and I’m quite sure he will, in inspiring the children in Scotland and wider.’

Headteacher Lorraine Slabbert said today she is 'hugely sad' Sir Andy plans to retire this year

Headteacher Lorraine Slabbert said today she is ‘hugely sad’ Sir Andy plans to retire this year

She said his visits to the school had shown pupils how to live active lives and taught them they can ‘do anything they want to do’.

She added: ‘Some of the children have already said when he has time on his hands they would love to see him here helping them out.’

Stirling Council leader Scott Farmer met Sir Andy when he was given the freedom of the city in 2014, and said he was ‘very nice’ and ‘unassuming’.

Mr Farmer said he is sad about a ‘premature end to a spectacular and outstanding career’.

He added: ‘Andy’s been a sensational ambassador for Stirling.’

 

From a spotty teenager learning his trade in Spain to a three-time Grand Slam champion… Britain’s greatest tennis player Andy Murray is pictured through the years

By MAX WINTERS FOR MAILONLINE 

Andy Murray’s spectacular tennis career appears to be coming to an end after he announced on Friday he would quit the sport after struggling to overcome a hip injury. 

The former British and World No 1 said he would retire after this year’s Wimbledon in an emotional press conference in Australia, though he admitted he may not make it that far.

Over the course of his career Sir Andy has won three Grand Slams, two Olympic gold medals, one ATP Tour Finals, a Davis Cup, finished 2016 as world No 1 and collected 45 ATP tour titles.  

Murray in action during the his Wimbledon boys' singles first round match

Murray poses for a photo in the Scottish town of Stirling in February 2003 as a 16-year-old

In 2002, Murray left home and went to train at the world-renowned Casal-Sanchez Academy in Barcelona for 18 months to develop his game.

He first emerged onto the scene in 1999 when he won Florida’s Orange Bowl in his age group, one of the most prestigious junior tournaments in the world. He won it again two years later.

The following year, a teenage Sir Andy left home and went to train at the world renowned Casal-Sanchez Academy in Barcelona for 18 months to develop his game. The coaching appeared to work as in 2004 he became the world’s No 1 junior player.

Sir Andy defeated Sergiy Stakhovsky to lift the U.S. Open junior title in New York City and later that year he received widespread acclaim, ending 2004 as the BBC’s Young Sports Personality of the Year.

Murray throws the ball into the crowd after his win over Sergiy Stakhovsky of Ukraine in the junior finals at the US Open

Murray warms up during the fifth day of Wimbledon 2005. In that year he also became the youngest British player to play in the Davis Cup.

Sir Andy defeated Sergiy Stakhovsky to lift the U.S. Open junior title in New York City and later that year he was named as the BBC’s Young Sports Personality of the Year. His rise through the ranks continued in 2005 when he became the youngest British player to compete in the Davis Cup, winning a doubles rubber against Israel.

His rise through the ranks continued in 2005 when he became the youngest British player to compete in the Davis Cup, winning a doubles rubber against Israel. He turned professional that year. 

2006 proved to be a huge moment in Sir Andy’s breakthrough in the professional ranks. He first beat Roger Federer at the Cincinnati Masters before overcoming Andy Roddick on his way to winning the SAP Open in San Jose, his first ATP Tour title.

Sir Andy built on that success in California in 2007 by defending his crown while there was also success at the St Petersburg Open, which helped him break into the world’s top 10. 

Murray trains with his coach Mark Petchey in preparation for the 2006 Tennis Channel Open in Las Vegas

Murray poses with Jocelyn Hockley and a koala at the Australian Open in 2007

2006 proved to be a huge moment in Sir Andy’s breakthrough in the professional ranks. He won the SAP Open in San Jose, his first ATP Tour title. Sir Andy built on that success in California in 2007 by defending his crown while there was also success at the St Petersburg Open, which helped him break into the world’s top 10

He then made major progress at Grand Slam tournaments in 2008 when he made it through to the quarter-finals of Wimbledon. Later that year he beat Rafael Nadal to reach the final of the US Open before losing to Federer at Flushing Meadows.  

Those results propelled him to No 2 in the world in 2009 before more Grand Slam heartbreak occurred in 2010 and 2011, when he finished as runner-up twice at the Australian Open in Melbourne.

January 2012 proved to be a critical turning point in Sir Andy’s career. He hired eight-time Grand Slam champion Ivan Lendl as his coach and the Czech helped him to the next level.

Murray hits a forehand during a practice session ahead of the 2008 Australian Open

Murray thanks fans after winning his match against Albert Montanes at the 2009 Qatar Open

There was major progress at Grand Slam tournaments in 2008 when he made it through to the quarter-finals of Wimbledon and US Open final. Those results propelled him to No. 2 in the world in 2009

In July 2012, Sir Andy made it through to his first Wimbledon final and became the first British male to do so since Bunny Austin in 1938.

It proved to be a devastating occasion though as Sir Andy squandered a one-set lead to lose to Federer on Centre Court before being reduced to tears in his post-match interview.

He earned redemption just four weeks later though when he claimed the Olympic gold medal at Wimbledon at London 2012 with a stunning straight sets win over the Swiss.

Murray plays a forehand in his first round match against Kevin Anderson on day one of the 2010 Australian Open

Murray arrives for Burberry's 2012 Spring Summer show on during the 2011 London Fashion week

There was more Grand Slam heartbreak for Sir Andy in 2010 and 2011, when he finished as runner-up twice at the Australian Open in Melbourne. He also made it through to the semi-finals of the 2011 French Open and went undefeated during the ‘Asia Swing’ after the US Open

There was further joy in the autumn as Sir Andy became the first player from Great Britain since 1977— and the first British man since 1936 — to win a Grand Slam singles title. He edged Novak Djokovic in a five-set thriller at the US Open. 

Sir Andy’s extraordinary 12 months concluded in the most fitting fashion as he finally ended his Wimbledon nightmare and made history. He once again edged Djokovic on the biggest stage to claim the men’s singles title at SW19. Sir Andy was the first British male to win the tournament in 77 years.

Sir Andy’s injury concerns began to linger in September 2013 when he was forced to undergo back surgery that forced his season to finish prematurely. Upon his return, Sir Andy crashed out of the 2014 Australian Open in the quarter-finals and dropped out of the world’s top five for the first time since 2008. 

Murray chats with partner Marcos Baghdatis as they take on Santiago Giraldo  and Kei Nishokori at the Brisbane International in 2012

Murray talks to the media during a press conference on day three of the Brisbane International in 2013

January 2012 proved to be a critical turning point in Sir Andy’s career as he hired Ivan Lendl as his coach. In a year of mixed emotions he lost a Wimbledon final but returned weeks later to win the Olympic gold medal

The successful partnership between Lendl and Sir Andy came to an end in March 2014 and the Scot replaced him with former women’s World No 1 Amelie Mauresmo three months later. 

Sir Andy seemed to be returning to his best when he made the Australian Open final in 2015 but was once again beaten when it mattered most. He endured further Grand Slam disappointment that year and lost in the semi-finals of both the French Open and Wimbledon before being knocked out in the US Open fourth round.

While individual success was scarce in 2015, Sir Andy helped Britain end their wait for Davis Cup glory by inspiring Leon Smith’s side to victory over Belgium in the final. Sir Andy beat David Goffin in straight sets in the decisive rubber, handing Britain their first Davis Cup victory since 1936.

Murray stretches during practice ahead of the 2014 Australian Open at Melbourne Park

Murray returns a shot to Thomaz Bellucci  during their 2015 US Open third round singles match

The successful partnership between Lendl and Sir Andy came to an end in March 2014 and the Scot replaced him with former women’s World No 1 Amelie Mauresmo three months later. While individual success was scarce in 2015, Sir Andy helped Britain end their wait for Davis Cup glory by inspiring Leon Smith’s side to victory over Belgium in the final

Sir Andy picked up where he left off in 2016, reaching another Australian Open final only to be beaten once again by Djokovic. He also impressed at the French Open, eliminating defending champion Stan Wawrinka to become the first British player to reach the final at Roland-Garros since 1937, but ultimately came up short against Djokovic once more. 

While there was disappointment in Australia and France, Sir Andy won his second Wimbledon title in the summer of 2016. He eased past Canada’s Milos Raonic in straight sets to win his third and most recent Grand Slam title.

Sir Andy reached another Australian Open final in 2016 only to be beaten once again by Djokovic. He also impressed at the French Open, becoming the first British player to reach the final at Roland-Garros since 1937. The Scot also won his second Wimbledon crown

Sir Andy reached another Australian Open final in 2016 only to be beaten once again by Djokovic. He also impressed at the French Open, becoming the first British player to reach the final at Roland-Garros since 1937. The Scot also won his second Wimbledon crown

There was more success just around the corner as Sir Andy beat Argentina’s Juan Martin del Potro at Rio 2016 to become the first male tennis player to successfully defend his Olympic singles title.

ATP Tour wins in Vienna, Shanghai and Beijing took Sir Andy to the verge of becoming world No 1 before reaching the final of the Paris Masters ensured the Briton dethroned Djokovic to reach the summit of the men’s game.

Hip trouble has plagued Sir Andy since he began to feel the flare-up of a long-standing issue that had previously been under control. He had a noticeable limp at Wimbledon 2017 but Sir Andy battled his way into the quarter-finals but his title defence ended there

Hip trouble has plagued Sir Andy since he began to feel the flare-up of a long-standing issue that had previously been under control. He had a noticeable limp at Wimbledon 2017 but Sir Andy battled his way into the quarter-finals but his title defence ended there

Hip trouble has plagued Sir Andy since he began to feel the flare-up of a long-standing issue that had previously been under control in June 2017. Walking with a noticeable limp at Wimbledon 2017, Sir Andy battled his way into the quarter-finals but his title defence ended with a five-set loss to Sam Querrey.

In January 2018, Sir Andy announced he had undergone hip surgery in Melbourne but just months later had suffered a setback in his recovery and was forced to take more time away from the court. In June, a lengthy 342 days since his last competitive outing, Sir Andy finally makes it back on court in the Fever-Tree Championships against Nick Kyrgios but loses his first-round match.

In January 2018, Sir Andy announced he had undergone hip surgery in Melbourne but just months later had suffered a setback in his recovery and was forced to take more time away from the court. He pulled out on the eve of Wimbledon

In January 2018, Sir Andy announced he had undergone hip surgery in Melbourne but just months later had suffered a setback in his recovery and was forced to take more time away from the court. He pulled out on the eve of Wimbledon

Two days after Christmas and despite some time away since losing to Fernando Verdasco in Asia in September, Sir Andy admits the pain is still prominent as he prepares to play in the Brisbane International, a warm-up tournament for the Australian Open.

In his last-16 tie against Russian star Daniil Medvedev, Sir Andy is comfortably beaten 7-5, 6-2 as fears grow over the condition of his hip. On Thursday, Sir Andy then left his Australian Open press conference in tears and suggests his time in Melbourne could be his last Grand Slam tournament due to the pain being too much to continue playing through.

Source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

R Kelly confirms he married Aaliyah when she was just 15, says late singer lied about her age 

Amazon Dash Buttons Deemed Illegal In Germany For Giving Shoppers Basically No Information