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Tom Brokaw lists his Westchester estate for $6.3M after his Montana ranch hits the market for $17.9M


Tom Brokaw is trying to unload two massive properties after being hit with multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

First up, his ranch in Montana, which Brokaw quietly put on the market late last year, asking $17.9 million for the 4,128 acre property in Park County. 

And earlier this month, Brokaw listed his home in Pound Ridge, approximately an hour outside the city, for $6.3 million. 

Brokaw and his wife Meredith still own a pied-a-terre in the Upper East Side which they purchased in 2011 for just under $2 million. 

Brokaw with expensive taste: Tom Brokaw (above at his Monatana ranch)  is unloading two of his three properties in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations, which he has firmly denied

Brokaw with expensive taste: Tom Brokaw (above at his Monatana ranch)  is unloading two of his three properties in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations, which he has firmly denied

Hey dude: Brokaw put his Montana ranch on the market late last year, asking $17.9 million for the 4,128 acre property in Park County (above)

Hey dude: Brokaw put his Montana ranch on the market late last year, asking $17.9 million for the 4,128 acre property in Park County (above)

Doolittle: 'Wildlife abounds, with massive trophy elk, mule and whitetail deer, upland birds, antelope and wild rainbow and brown trout,' says the listing (river on ranch above)

Doolittle: ‘Wildlife abounds, with massive trophy elk, mule and whitetail deer, upland birds, antelope and wild rainbow and brown trout,’ says the listing (river on ranch above)

Hideaway: Brokaw listed his home in Pound Ridge, New York, approximately an hour outside the city, for $6.3 million earlier this month (property above)

Hideaway: Brokaw listed his home in Pound Ridge, New York, approximately an hour outside the city, for $6.3 million earlier this month (property above)

News of the ranch’s sale was first revealed in The Land Report, with Brokaw appearing on the cover of the trade publication’s winter issue.

‘The ranch runs from the banks of the West Boulder River to the public land abutting the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness,’ reads the listing on Lands of America.

‘Wildlife abounds throughout the ranch, with massive trophy elk, mule and whitetail deer, upland birds, antelope and wild rainbow and brown trout. With world-class fly fishing, miles of trails to hike and horseback ride, and two beautiful ponds for swimming, the ranch plays host to families and kids of all ages, and seems to have an endless ability to entertain and amaze.’

It is the second ranch that Brokaw has owned, with the anchor also having purchased a property in British Columbia with a group of fly fishing friends that he sold back in 2013.

The Westchester property has served as his weekend retreat for some time, with Brokaw favoring the Pound Ridge property in upstate New York over a home in the Hamptons.

The listing was first reported by The Real Deal, and Ginnel Real Estate calls the home the ‘ultimate getaway.’ 

It is located at the edge of a five-acre lake with enough land to build at least two other homes per that listing.

‘Stunning interior spaces with wide-plank pine floors, Venetian plaster walls, exposed beams and walls of glass to capture light and views,’ reads the listing.

‘Impressive Great Room with vaulted ceiling, stone fireplace and doors to Screened Porch, overlooking the water.’

Brokaw and his wife purchased the property back in 1998 for $4.25 million, which was just a few years after Brokaw allegedly tried to kiss his colleague Linda Vester.

Vester was a war correspondent for NBC in the 1990s who went on to host Weekend Today before leaving for Fox News.

She told The Washington Post and Variety magazine that Brokaw forcibly tried to kiss her on two occassions, first in 1994 and then again in 1995.

That timeline means that both of those alleged incidents occurred while Brokaw was the network’s star anchor.

Brokaw initially said that he met Vester twice, ‘both at her request’ because she wanted career advice.

‘The meetings were brief, cordial and appropriate, and despite Linda’s allegations, I made no romantic overtures towards her at that time or any other,’ he said in a statement.

Then came the letter, in which Brokaw declared: ‘My family and friends are stunned and supportive. My NBC colleagues are bewildered that Vester, who had limited success at NBC News, a modest career at Fox and a reputation as a colleague who had trouble with the truth was suddenly the keeper of the flame of journalistic integrity.’

In addition to Vester, a 24-year-old production assistant who also worked at NBC around the same time as Vester accused Brokaw of sexual harassment.

One day later, a third woman, Mary Reinholz, said Brokaw forcibly tried to kiss her in 1968 when they both worked in California.

That incident happened at her home and two were not co-workers.

As is often the case in many of these incidents, Vester did not report Brokaw’s harassment to management or executives at the network, and during the interview she explained the reason for her silence.

‘Let me paint a picture of what it was like inside NBC News when this happened. I was a young reporter, just getting started,’ said Vester on Good Morning America last month.

‘Tom Brokaw was the most powerful man at the network, so the idea that I could go forward to management and say that I had been assaulted by the most powerful man at the network and a major moneymaker, well, that just wasn’t going to get heard.’

Vester went on to tell Stephanopoulos that she did not feel HR at the network was equipped to hand that sort of situation either, and so she chose to stay quiet.

‘I felt it was unsafe to go to NBC, and I never felt safe at NBC News again,’ said Vester.

NBC is now interested in talking to Vester in the wake of her claims, but she said that she is reluctant to speak with a team of lawyers and executives from her former place of employment.

‘They called my attorney and said they would like to talk to me and our answer is, as soon as NBC news or NBC Universal hires outside counsel to do a proper, thorough investigation, I will be glad to sit down,’ explained Vester.

That statement came one day after NBC revealed that the six-month internal investigation into Matt Lauer’s sexual misconduct had determined that no executives or upper-management at Today or NBC News knew about the host’s predatory behavior.

Vetser thinks that investigation, and others like it, are a waste of time.

‘Well, I mean I think it’s common sense. You can’t investigate yourself. You just can’t,’ stated Vester.

‘There’s an internal bias. That’s how it works, so you have to have outside counsel.’

Vetser was then asked about the letter supporting Brokaw that was signed by a number of high-profile female staffers at NBC in the wake of her allegations.

She acknowledged that it is ‘everyone’s right to defend a friend,’ but noted: ‘What concerns me is the message that that petition may have actually sent, the fact that that petition was sent around internally to employees could be viewed by many as intimidation, as pressure, not to report any misconduct.’

Vetser then suggested that those women take a different approach and use their voices ‘to call on NBC Universal to hire outside counsel to really get to the bottom of this long-standing widespread problem of sexual misconduct by multiple men at the top of the power structure of NBC News.’

Brokaw meanwhile has not been in touch with Vester she revealed, and when asked what she wanted from the anchor she had just one request.

‘An apology would be nice, but I think he set the tone for the conversation that’s not really helpful,’ said Vester.

‘What’s so much more important is that NBC news not only investigate the culture broadly but now there are three women, I’m not the only one who has accused Tom Brokaw of misconduct. And NBC News has yet in over a week to say that it will conduct an investigation into Tom Brokaw.’

Vetser went on to say that she views Brokaw as a wolf in sheep’s clothing when compared to other offenders.

‘Some people might be tempted to believe that all harassers look and act like Harvey Weinstein. It’s not true,’ said Vester.

‘Some of them can look like cultural icons like Tom Brokaw and they can be decent during the day to a lot of people and actually be really kind a lot of the time. And yet still have hidden behavior.’

Vetser also said that she has no interest in a lawsuit, but at the same time was not going to stay quiet.

‘A lot of brave people, brave people started this movement, the me too movement and broke the dam and I am kind of standing on their shoulders, or really following in their footsteps and just trying to help continue this movement and move the discussion along so that we can make it better for everyone in the workplace,’ she said. 



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