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Tom Wolfe's will reveals he left the bulk of fortune to wife of 40 years and asked to be cremated


Late author Tom Wolfe left his estate to his wife and two children, it has been revealed.

Wolfe’s will was filed in Manhattan Surrogate’s Court on Thursday.

The ‘new journalism’ pioneer left his wife, Sheila, ‘all of the tangible personal property’ and ‘all my right, title and interest to any real property and any cooperative apartment used by me or my family as a residence…,’ according to court paper.

The rights to his books will be left to his two children, Alexandra and Tommy, according to the New York Daily News.

Late author Tom Wolfe (center) left his estate to his wife, Sheila (right), and his two children, it has been revealed. His son, Tommy Wolfe, is seen left. The photo above is from 2015

Late author Tom Wolfe (center) left his estate to his wife, Sheila (right), and his two children, it has been revealed. His son, Tommy Wolfe, is seen left. The photo above is from 2015

While there isn’t an extensive breakdown of how much Wolfe was worth, probate paperwork indicates that his estate is valued north of $500,000.

The 12-page will, which was drawn up in 2015, also asks that Wolfe’s body be cremated. 

Wolfe, who captured the mood and culture of America across five decades with books including The Bonfire of the Vanities, The Right Stuff, and The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, died last month at the age of 88.

Wolfe, who had a knack for coining phrases such as ‘radical chic’ and ‘the me decade,’ died of an unspecified infection in a New York City hospital.

Wolfe’s works – fiction and non-fiction alike – looked at realms ranging from the art world to Wall Street to 1960s hippie culture and touched on the issues of class, power, race, corruption and sex.

Wolfe's daughter, Alexandra, who is also a journalist, is seen above in this 2013 file photo

Wolfe’s daughter, Alexandra, who is also a journalist, is seen above in this 2013 file photo

‘I think every living moment of a human being’s life, unless the person is starving or in immediate danger of death in some other way, is controlled by a concern for status,’ Wolfe said in a Wall Street Journal interview.

Wolfe came up with ‘radical chic’ to brand pretentious liberals, the ‘me decade’ to sum up the self-indulgence of the 1970s and the ‘right stuff’ to quantify intangible characteristics of the first U.S. astronauts and their test pilot predecessors.

He was never deterred by the fact that he often did not fit in with his research subjects, partly because he was such a sartorial dandy, known for his white suits.

Wolfe was in his mid-70s while hanging out with college kids and working on the novel I Am Charlotte Simmons, and was a fairly conservative drug-free observer in a coat and tie while traveling with Ken Kesey and his LSD-dropping hippie tribe known as The Merry Pranksters for The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test in the ‘60s.

By looking so out of place, he figured people would be more prone to explain things to him. 



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